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appreciation

Four, seven-point items are used to measure a person’s belief that an entity (such as a company or person) has responded to his/her idea sharing in such a way that it enriched one’s social value.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items were used to measure how much a person notices and values the effort expended by a person or company to produce an object.  To be clear, the scale measures a general attitude about things that are made rather than being specific to a particular producer or product.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person feels appreciated by a business or other party based on some action it has taken, e.g., expressing gratitude for his/her business.

The scale has three, nine-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s belief that others are thankful for him/her.  The reason for the gratitude is unstated.

A consumer’s response to an offer of something of value is measured with five, seven-point semantic differentials.  The emphasis is on one’s affective reaction to the offer.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person feels a sense of emotional appreciation for unspecified benefits received from a certain party.

The scale is composed of six, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure the degree to which a person believes that his/her support of a particular organization is truly appreciated.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a person thinks that those people who volunteer to help raise funds for a nonprofit organization are given special recognition for their effort by the organization.

Three, three-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which one believes that donating time to an organization benefits the community and is appreciated. The measure was referred to as benefit to the community by Yavas and Riecken (1985).