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authenticity

The scale uses four, nine-point items to measure which of two objects a person considers to be more valuable and preferable to own. 

The rarity and scarcity of an object, such as a product, is measured in this scale with three, nine-point Likert-type items.

Six, nine-point semantic differentials measure the degree to which a consumer believes a product is an accurate fulfillment of the creator’s vision.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s attitude regarding the bias and believability of a particular news story to which he/she has been exposed.

Three, nine-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes an object has a special intangible quality, something that can be viewed as its “essence” or “aura.”

With four items, the scale measures the degree to which a product is believed to be genuine and original in some unstated way.  

Nine-point Likert-type items are used to measure a consumer’s belief that there is evidence that a particular product is genuinely a particular brand rather than a fake or confusingly similar one.  A two- and a four-item version are provided.

A consumer’s belief that a particular product contains the legitimate and genuine character of a particular brand is measured with three, nine-point Likert-type items. The scale could also be referred to as measuring “contagion” or “transferred essence.”

The extent to which a person believes that a particular story and the facts stated in it are correct is measured in this scale using three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale seems to be amenable for use with advertisements, books, and movies by simply replacing the word "story" in each item with something else if desired.

The scale has three, five-point uni-polar items and measures how important a person believes realism and believability are in evaluating an advertisement's quality.