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The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items and measures the degree to which a person believes another person is like him/her in terms of communication style, with an emphasis on nonverbal expression.

The scale has eight, seven-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure a person's belief in either the stability of body type (entity theory) or their ability to change basic body characteristics (incremental theory).  To be clear, beliefs about the nature of human bodies in general are measured by this scale rather than what people think about a particular person’s body.

The tendency for a person to notice and attend to thoughts and feelings having to do with physical aspects of his/her body is measured with six, seven-point items.

A person’s tendency to express and verbalize his/her thoughts and feelings is measured with eight items.

The tendency for a person to notice or attend to a variety of stimuli, both internal (such as thoughts and feelings) as well as external (such as sights, sounds, and smells) is measured with 12 items.

Twenty, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how comfortable a person is with touching and being touched by others.   The statements are gender-neutral.  The emphasis is on the importance of physical contact rather than the gender of those who are touching.

One's preference for the use of the face and body to physically express positive emotions in communication is measured with five, six-point Likert type items.  The focus of the scale is on others' nonverbal expression of emotion.  A person's own level of physical expressiveness is not measured.

The perceived size of a person's body is measured in this scale using three, seven-point semantic differentials.  Given the phrasing of one of the items, the description is relative in that the body being described is compared to another body such as the respondent's.

The scale is composed of eight, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person has the sense of being at/in (presence) a remote/virtual environment (tele). Thus, afterwards the person is left with a feeling of having been psychologically transported to a "world" created at a website such that for a time it was as if they were there rather than the physical place where the viewing was done (home, office).

Ten, six-point items are used to measure the extent of a person's concern about his/her body, with particular emphasis on the anxiety caused by one's body shape and how it is might be viewed by others.