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The degree to which a person reports having to force him/herself to continue engaging in an arithmetically-intensive task is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

This scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how easily a shopper is able to use the necessary math to compute a discount offered by a retailer.  The scale makes sense to use when a discount is not explicit but rather must be calculated by the consumer by using the information provided, e.g., regular price and sale price.

How much a person likes to study math and is confident in his/her mathematical aptitude is measured in this scale with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

With eight, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the tendency of a person to use numerical information, to engage in thinking with such information, and to enjoy it.

The scale uses three, nine-point Likert-type items to measure how complicated a person believes a certain task was that involved some degree of mathematical computation.

This nine item, seven-point Likert-type scale is intended to measure the degree to which a person follows the instructions given to him/her as part of a weight loss program.