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celebrity

Using 13 Likert-type items and a 101-point response format, the scale measures the degree to which a person reports having one-way affiliation behavior and desires with a media celebrity. 

A person’s confidence in a brand that has been endorsed by a particular celebrity and willingness to buy the product is measured with three, six-point Likert-type items.

How interested and excited a person is when exposed to the image of a particular celebrity is measured with five, seven-point semantic differentials.  The emphasis is on how compelling the image is rather than its favorability. 

Eight, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s desire to establish a relationship and communicate with a particular person on Twitter.  The scale may make most sense to use when the specified person is a celebrity.

How much an object is worth to a person is measured in this scale with three items.  Although the scale might be used for other purposes, it makes the most sense when used with an object that has been owned or associated with someone who could be viewed by the respondent as a "celebrity."  Even if that person is not liked, the association may lead to the object being valued more by the respondent than it otherwise would have been.

The scale is composed of four, five-point items measuring the degree to which a person believes certain attributes of a celebrity are important if that person is to be an endorser in some ads. The attributes in this scale have to do with the physical attractiveness of the celebrity as well as the fit between the endorser, the product, and the target audience. The scale was called congruence by Erdogan, Baker, and Tagg (2001).

The scale is composed of three, five-point items measuring the importance of certain attributes of a celebrity if he/she is to be used as an endorser in an ad. The attributes in this scale have to do with the celebrity's risk of being controversial and his/her trustworthiness.

The importance of certain celebrity attributes if that person is to be hired as an endorser in advertising is measured using five, five-point items. The attributes in this scale have to do with the celebrity's profession and whether or not he/she is a user of the brand. The scale was called profession by Erdogan, Baker, and Tagg (2001).

This semantic differential scale is intended to measure a person's attitude about another person, such as a celebrity, whose statement or likeness is used in an advertisement as a form of endorsement for a product.  A three item, nine-point version as well as four item, seven-point version are reviewed.