You are here

customization

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person is not pleased with the features he/she choose while customizing a product and would feel better if given the chance to change them.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person feels good about the way he/she customized a product for him/herself and would make the same decision again.

In this scale, four statements measure a customer’s belief that a particular service provider involves him/her in shaping resources and experiences to fit one’s preference.

The scale uses four statements to measure whether a person believes that an ad was deliberately personalized for his/her situation.  To be clear, the scale does not measure if someone liked/disliked the personalization but rather if some degree of personalization was noted in the ad.

Three questions with seven-point semantic differential response scales are employed to measure how well a person reports being able to imagine a product he/she is customizing.

The scale uses four statements to measure a consumer's belief that Internet shopping websites should treat shoppers as individuals, allowing them to personalize their experiences.  As currently phrased, the items are not specific to a particular website but rather to shopping sites in general.

The degree to which a customer believes a company's self-service technology (SST) is personalized based on its understanding of his/her individual preferences and needs is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person's self-expressed level of skill and creativity in designing some specified object is measured in this scale using four, nine-point Likert-type items.

Six, nine-point Likert-type items measure a person's confidence that a product that he/has has recently designed (but does not have in physical form) will be good and enjoyable.

The scale measures the degree to which a consumer believes a product he/she designed is attractive and desirable, Two slightly different versions of the scale were used by Moreau and Herd (2010; Moreau 2012).  Both versions used six items with a nine-point response format.