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endorsement

Seven-point, Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a person perceives there to be a relationship between an endorser and a product, such that the pairing of the two is viewed as a "good fit." This measure was referred to as relatedness by Sengupta, Goodstein, and Boninger (1997).

The scale is composed of four, five-point items measuring the degree to which a person believes certain attributes of a celebrity are important if that person is to be an endorser in some ads. The attributes in this scale have to do with the physical attractiveness of the celebrity as well as the fit between the endorser, the product, and the target audience. The scale was called congruence by Erdogan, Baker, and Tagg (2001).

The scale is composed of three, five-point items measuring the importance of certain attributes of a celebrity if he/she is to be used as an endorser in an ad. The attributes in this scale have to do with the celebrity's risk of being controversial and his/her trustworthiness.

The importance of certain celebrity attributes if that person is to be hired as an endorser in advertising is measured using five, five-point items. The attributes in this scale have to do with the celebrity's profession and whether or not he/she is a user of the brand. The scale was called profession by Erdogan, Baker, and Tagg (2001).

This semantic differential scale is intended to measure a person's attitude about another person, such as a celebrity, whose statement or likeness is used in an advertisement as a form of endorsement for a product.  A three item, nine-point version as well as four item, seven-point version are reviewed.