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The degree to which a person believes there is a relationship between the healthiness of food and its cost such that healthier foods tend to be more expensive than unhealthy foods is measured with three, seven-point items.

The scale uses three, five-point Likert-type items to measure the extent to which a consumer believes a brand is on sale a lot and not expensive.

With three, seven-point semantic-differentials, this scale measures the extent to which a consumer believes a product to be either a luxury brand (at one end) or a “value” brand (at the other end).

Using three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures some cost-related reasons a consumer has for not installing a particular energy-saving device.

A person’s attitude regarding the cost of a brand and its affordability is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items. 

The degree to which a consumer believes that "green" products cost more than products that are not considered "green" is measured in this scale with three statements. 

The degree to which a consumer views expensive products/brands as forms of self-reward and purchases them for that reason is measured with this four item, seven-point Likert-type scale.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure a consumer's attitude toward the price of a product with an emphasis on the extent to which it is viewed as a good deal.

The degree to which a person believes that the number and quality of a person's possessions are indicators of success in life is measured using five point Likert-type statements. Alternative versions of the scale, varying in their length, have been developed and tested.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point statements that measure the degree to which a person believes that the advertised price for a product is high. The scale was called perceptions of sacrifice by Suri and Monroe (2003).