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experiences

Three, ten-point items are used in this scale to measure how well a customer’s experiences with a brand compare to his/her expectations and the ideal product.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer expresses having an enjoyable experience with a purchased product he/has worked to create with the producer.

Using three, ten-point items, the scale measures a customer’s evaluation of the quality of a brand's goods and/or services based on recent consumption experiences.

The scale measures the degree to which a person liked a particular experience he/she had.  Versions with two and four items are described.

How much a person liked a particular experience and thought it was fun is measured in this scale with four, nine-point items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a consumer has a special bond with a certain product, especially of an affective and sentimental nature.

"This Likert scale uses four, seven-point items to measure the degree to which a person believes that the benefit or value a consumer experiences with respect to a product is dependent upon the individual, i.e., some consumers enjoy more value from a product than others do.  Although the construct measured by this scale shares some similarity to the construct by the same name used in accounting, it is treated as an attitude in this scale rather than as a form of net present value.

How a customer believes an actual experience compares to what he/she expected it to be is measured with five, seven-point semantic differentials.

Six, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s desire to experience consistency and stability at the current time rather than change.

The extent to which a consumer believes that a brand was part of an experience that he/she had is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  The items connote an anthropomorphic view of the brand.