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popularity

How much a person has experienced the feeling of being isolated and ostracized is measured with three, seven-point items.  Clear instructions should be provided to participants so that they respond with respect to a particular time period.

Three, nine-point items are used to measure the likelihood that a particular product or brand will be in short supply.  The timeframe is not stated in the items themselves but could be easily stated in the instructions.

The anticipated popularity of a new product and the interest among consumers in purchasing it is measured with three, seven-point questions.

How popular and friendly a person appears to be is measured using three semantic differentials.  As used by Fisher and Ma (2014), the judgement is made regarding someone else rather than oneself.

The extent to which a consumer believes that a particular product or brand is in short supply due to unintentional order problems or greater demand than expected is measured using a three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale.

A person's belief about the perceived market share for a certain product is measured in this scale with three, six-point items.

A four-item, seven-point semantic differential is used to measure the degree of popularity that a specified brand is perceived to have. The scale was used by Mishra, Umesh, and Stem (1993) with reference to a ''decoy'' brand and was referred to as perceived decoy popularity.

Four, five point statements are used to measure the degree of importance a person places on being accepted by others his/her own age. Given the phrasing of several of the items, especially #3, the scale is most appropriate for use with teenagers.

The scale has five, five point statements and measures the degree to which a person believes that smoking is acceptable and, in fact, is attractive to his/her circle of friends. Given the phrasing of items #4 and #5, the scale is most appropriate for teens. The scale was called severity of social disapproval risks by Pechmann et al. (2003).

The scale is composed of five, seven-point semantic differentials that are intended to measure the degree to which a person believes a particular person, place, or thing is socially acceptable and desirable.