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willingness

The scale has three, seven-point items that measure a person's expressed likelihood of advising friends, family, and others not to buy a particular brand.

Three, seven-point items compose the scale and measure a person's expressed likelihood of recommending a brand to others, particularly those who ask for advice.

After having played a game, a person's desire to play it again sometime in the future is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale is not considered a measure of intention since the statements do not express a specific time to play again but merely that the person "would like to play."

The extent to which a person is open to immediately going to a store and consuming a particular snack food if given the chance is measured with three, nine-point Likert-type items.  The measure has three, nine-point Likert-type items.  Given the phrasing of one of the items, the scale is most appropriate for those snack foods sold in a store rather than a vending machine.

This Likert-type scale measures a person's readiness to support a political official continuing in office and/or being reelected though being involved in a scandal.

Five items are used to measure a consumer's attitude about and willingness to buy products from a particular company.  Given the hypothetical and temporal vagueness of the items, the construct being measured might also be referred to as attitude toward the act of purchasing.  The scale is somewhat unique in that the items do not share a common response format.

The degree to which a customer is willing to pay more for a particular brand of a product over competing brands is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure the likelihood that a customer will pay more to continue receiving service from a particular provider.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type statements that are used to measure a customer's expressed likelihood of suggesting to others that they buy from a particular business (company or retailer) in the future.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure a customer's attitude about providing personal information to a person or organization.