You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

acceptance

How much a person has experienced the feeling of being isolated and ostracized is measured with three, seven-point items.  Clear instructions should be provided to participants so that they respond with respect to a particular time period.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person is concerned about posting something in a social medium because of what others will think and whether the posting will affect his/her acceptance.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person believes that talking to another person about a particular topic could produce a favorable impression for him/herself.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s attitude about the radical change a particular organization is about to make regarding what it stands for.  As currently phrased and scored, the items indicate the respondent is against the repositioning.  Also, the scale instructions frame the situation as hypothetical but minor changes could make the scale amenable for use with a real event.

The scale uses three, five-point items to measure how much a child believes a parent was disappointed with him/her and too busy to spend time together.

The degree to which a child believes his/her relationship with a parent to be (or have been) encouraging and comforting is measured with four, five-point items.

The scale uses three, five-point items to measure how much someone has felt self-conscious and has looked to others, particularly friends, to know how to act.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure to what degree a person believes that a social standard of a particular group of people makes sense and is of benefit to them.  The norm is not stated in the items themselves and must be provided to participants some way.

With seven, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes he/she is liked by others and part of a group (unspecified).

With five, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the desire by a customer to use acts of goodwill to restore or rebuild a damaged relationship with an offending company.