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Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

acceptance

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure how much a person feels that he/she might not be accepted by “others” (unspecified) because of a choice he/she made.

How much a person has experienced the feeling of being isolated and ostracized is measured with three, seven-point items.  Clear instructions should be provided to participants so that they respond with respect to a particular time period.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person is concerned about posting something in a social medium because of what others will think and whether the posting will affect his/her acceptance.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person believes that talking to another person about a particular topic could produce a favorable impression for him/herself.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s attitude about the radical change a particular organization is about to make regarding what it stands for.  As currently phrased and scored, the items indicate the respondent is against the repositioning.  Also, the scale instructions frame the situation as hypothetical but minor changes could make the scale amenable for use with a real event.

The scale uses three, five-point items to measure how much a child believes a parent was disappointed with him/her and too busy to spend time together.

The degree to which a child believes his/her relationship with a parent to be (or have been) encouraging and comforting is measured with four, five-point items.

The scale uses three, five-point items to measure how much someone has felt self-conscious and has looked to others, particularly friends, to know how to act.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure to what degree a person believes that a social standard of a particular group of people makes sense and is of benefit to them.  The norm is not stated in the items themselves and must be provided to participants some way.

With seven, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes he/she is liked by others and part of a group (unspecified).