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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

acceptance

This scale has three, seven-point uni-polar items that measure how acceptable and proper an object or activity seems to be.  The measure is general in the sense that, with the right instructions, the items are amenable for use in a wide variety of situations.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure how much a person feels that he/she might not be accepted by “others” (unspecified) because of a choice he/she made.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure how much a person feels that he/she might not be accepted by “others” (unspecified) because of a choice he/she made.

How much a person has experienced the feeling of being isolated and ostracized is measured with three, seven-point items.  Clear instructions should be provided to participants so that they respond with respect to a particular time period.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person is concerned about posting something in a social medium because of what others will think and whether the posting will affect his/her acceptance.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person believes that talking to another person about a particular topic could produce a favorable impression for him/herself.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s attitude about the radical change a particular organization is about to make regarding what it stands for.  As currently phrased and scored, the items indicate the respondent is against the repositioning.  Also, the scale instructions frame the situation as hypothetical but minor changes could make the scale amenable for use with a real event.

The scale uses three, five-point items to measure how much a child believes a parent was disappointed with him/her and too busy to spend time together.

The degree to which a child believes his/her relationship with a parent to be (or have been) encouraging and comforting is measured with four, five-point items.

The scale uses three, five-point items to measure how much someone has felt self-conscious and has looked to others, particularly friends, to know how to act.