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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

accomplishment

The pride a person feels after accomplishing a particular task is measured with four, seven-point Likert items.

Using six, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes that consuming a particular product or brand would help attain some of his/her life goals. 

The degree to which a person believes that, in general, one person’s good outcomes come at the expense of another person is measured with six, 10-point Likert-type items.

The extent to which a person feels a sense of achievement having played a game and performed well is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person's focus on utilitarian reasons for shopping rather than hedonic is measured with six, seven-point items.  The focus of the measure is on completing the shopping task rather than the pleasure derived from engaging in the shopping process itself.

The level of self-satisfaction and sense of accomplishment one feels as a result of something in particular is measured with five, nine-point unipolar items.

The level of a person's commitment to achieve a specified goal is measured in this scale with three, seven-point items.

The extent to which a person reports feeling a sense of self-esteem and honor is measured in this scale with three, seven-point uni-polar items.

The degree to which a person prefers to act independently rather than as a member of a group, with a strong sense of freedom, autonomy, and personal achievement is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

The five, nine-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person has strong, positive affective responses to the occurrence or expectation of reward-like events.