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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

adaptation

The belief that one can change his/her personal traits is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

With five, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the desire by a customer to use acts of goodwill to restore or rebuild a damaged relationship with an offending company.

The scale uses four statements to measure a consumer's belief that Internet shopping websites should treat shoppers as individuals, allowing them to personalize their experiences.  As currently phrased, the items are not specific to a particular website but rather to shopping sites in general.

A person's belief that personalized advertising has benefits such as being treated as an individual and receiving relevant information is measured in this scale with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a customer believes a company's self-service technology (SST) is personalized based on its understanding of his/her individual preferences and needs is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The pleasure a shopper gets from being able to have websites contact him/her about personally relevant new products and deals is measured in this scale using four, seven-point items.

This scale has three statements that are used to measure the extent to which a consumer takes responsibility for changing something about his/her search activity in the future in order to improve the likelihood of successfully finding a certain product. The scale was called active coping by Reynolds, Folse, and Jones (2006).

This scale uses five, seven-point statements to measure the degree to which a person believes that a product is able to improve its performance over time by storing information and adapting to its environment.

The three item, five-point Likert-type statements measure the degree to which a consumer has modified services offered by a provider so as to better suit his/her needs. The scale was called modification by Burnham, Frels, and Mahajan (2003).

The scale is composed of five, seven-point Likert type statements intended to measure a person's attitude about the extent to which a website tailors its products, promotion, and transactional environment to individual customers.