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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

adaptation

The belief that one can change his/her personal traits is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

With five, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the desire by a customer to use acts of goodwill to restore or rebuild a damaged relationship with an offending company.

The scale uses four statements to measure a consumer's belief that Internet shopping websites should treat shoppers as individuals, allowing them to personalize their experiences.  As currently phrased, the items are not specific to a particular website but rather to shopping sites in general.

A person's belief that personalized advertising has benefits such as being treated as an individual and receiving relevant information is measured in this scale with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a customer believes a company's self-service technology (SST) is personalized based on its understanding of his/her individual preferences and needs is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The pleasure a shopper gets from being able to have websites contact him/her about personally relevant new products and deals is measured in this scale using four, seven-point items.

This scale has three statements that are used to measure the extent to which a consumer takes responsibility for changing something about his/her search activity in the future in order to improve the likelihood of successfully finding a certain product. The scale was called active coping by Reynolds, Folse, and Jones (2006).

This scale uses five, seven-point statements to measure the degree to which a person believes that a product is able to improve its performance over time by storing information and adapting to its environment.

The three item, five-point Likert-type statements measure the degree to which a consumer has modified services offered by a provider so as to better suit his/her needs. The scale was called modification by Burnham, Frels, and Mahajan (2003).

The scale is composed of five, seven-point Likert type statements intended to measure a person's attitude about the extent to which a website tailors its products, promotion, and transactional environment to individual customers.