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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

advertising

Five, seven-point items measure the degree to which an advertisement caused a person to think of happy events in his/her own life.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how well organized and easy to understand an ad is which a person has seen.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes that a particular advertisement has been aimed at him/her due to some behavior or characteristic inferred by the advertiser.

The scale has five, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person believes a particular advertisement contains elements that are novel or unusual and yet artistically arranged.

Using three, six-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s familiarity and proficiency with the language used in a particular advertisement.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes a particular advertisement addressed his/her concerns about a product that was important to him/her.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures not only the degree to which a person considers a particular advertisement to be interesting but that he/she was involved in it.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure whether the product featured in an ad is considered fresh and new or old and routine.

The extent to which a person relied on his/her emotions and intuition when evaluating an advertisement is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

How interested and excited a person is when exposed to the image of a particular celebrity is measured with five, seven-point semantic differentials.  The emphasis is on how compelling the image is rather than its favorability.