You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your research. Search Now

Testimonial

The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

advertising

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure whether the product featured in an ad is considered fresh and new or old and routine.

The extent to which a person relied on his/her emotions and intuition when evaluating an advertisement is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

How interested and excited a person is when exposed to the image of a particular celebrity is measured with five, seven-point semantic differentials.  The emphasis is on how compelling the image is rather than its favorability. 

A person’s attitude about the appropriateness of sex being used in advertising, TV programs, and other media is measured with three items.

The scale has seven, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a consumer is motivated to resist a specific object, such as an ad, that is believed to have been forced upon him/her.  The emphasis is on the impropriety of the object rather than how much it limits one’s decision-making freedom.

The degree to which a person has negative beliefs about advertising in general is measured with five, five-point Likert-type items.

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person believes a particular advertisement is understandable and useful.

The scale has four, seven-point semantic differentials that are intended to measure the visual clarity and intensity of a particular advertisement.

This three item, seven point scale measures the extent to which a person had difficulty distinguishing product relevant information from background graphics in a particular advertisement. As written, the scale is most suited for a print ad.

How much change a person believes there to be in the market for a particular product category in terms of the products available, the promotion conducted, and consumer preferences is measured using four, seven-point items.