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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

advertising

How much a person feels worried and anxious after exposure to an advertisement is measured with three, seven-point items.

Using three, four-point items, the scale measures how often a person has negative thoughts about commercials.  The scale was made for use by children.

The scale uses seven, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s belief that an advertisement misleads people with its claims and implications about a particular product’s environmentally-related attributes.

This scale has seven, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person was engaged in the “flow” of an advertisement and felt better because of it.

With three, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures how large or small an object is perceived to be.  The scale is considered general because it appears like it could be used for evaluating a wide variety of stimuli.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person believes that a particular object looks complex.   

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s usage of two media at the same time to perform one or more tasks.  To be clear, the scale focuses on what a person did in a particular situation rather than his/her tendency over time to multi-task.

How much a person believes that an advertising message explains why customers should participate in an activity is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes an advertising message stresses how customers can participate in an activity.

Using three, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a person believes a certain advertisement provides accurate information.