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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

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The extent to which a person associates the words “down” with “less” and “up” with “more” is measured using six, nine-point items.

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure how much a person believes that the information in a particular advertisement is too complicated and should be simplified.

Whether a person thought the message of an advertisement was more focused on self or on social entities such as family is measured with five, seven-point semantic differentials.

How much a person identifies with the information in a particular advertisement is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items. 

The belief that responding to an advertisement would require the disclosure of one's private information is measured with three, seven-point items.

A seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure how much a person believes or “feels” that a particular object in an ad appears it be moving in the appropriate direction.   Both a four-item and a three-item version are described.

The scale is composed of six items meant to measure a person’s motivation to process
information from an advertisement at the time of brand choice.

The extent to which a person perceives an object to be tangible and realistic-looking is measured with three, uni-polar items.

The extent to which a person feels that an object is close to one’s self rather than far away is measured using four, seven-point items.

The scale measures the extent to which a visual pattern, such as in a print advertisement, is interpreted as indicating motion, particularly forward movement.  Four, seven-point semantic differential phrases compose the scale.