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Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

advertising

The scale has five, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person believes a particular advertisement contains elements that are novel or unusual and yet artistically arranged.

Using three, six-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s familiarity and proficiency with the language used in a particular advertisement.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes a particular advertisement addressed his/her concerns about a product that was important to him/her.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures not only the degree to which a person considers a particular advertisement to be interesting but that he/she was involved in it.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure whether the product featured in an ad is considered fresh and new or old and routine.

The extent to which a person relied on his/her emotions and intuition when evaluating an advertisement is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

How interested and excited a person is when exposed to the image of a particular celebrity is measured with five, seven-point semantic differentials.  The emphasis is on how compelling the image is rather than its favorability. 

A person’s attitude about the appropriateness of sex being used in advertising, TV programs, and other media is measured with three items.

The scale has seven, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a consumer is motivated to resist a specific object, such as an ad, that is believed to have been forced upon him/her.  The emphasis is on the impropriety of the object rather than how much it limits one’s decision-making freedom.

The degree to which a person has negative beliefs about advertising in general is measured with five, five-point Likert-type items.