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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

advertising

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s usage of two media at the same time to perform one or more tasks.  To be clear, the scale focuses on what a person did in a particular situation rather than his/her tendency over time to multi-task.

How much a person believes that an advertising message explains why customers should participate in an activity is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes an advertising message stresses how customers can participate in an activity.

Using three, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a person believes a certain advertisement provides accurate information.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure a person’s judgement of whether an advertisement emphasized benefits gained by the person taking an action or the losses and costs if the action was not taken. 

The degree to which a person has been persuaded by an advertisement to engage in behaviors that support of a particular cause is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

Using six, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes that consuming a particular product or brand would help attain some of his/her life goals. 

Using five, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s emotional involvement in an advertisement.

The five item, nine-point Likert scale measures a person’s belief that an advertisement uses a story-like format that communicates information about critical structural components such as who, what, where, and why. 

This Likert scale measures a person’s admission that he/she was easily influenced by the message in a particular ad and had difficulty resisting it.  A seven- and a four-item version are discussed.  Although the scale was made for use with ads, it can be easily modified for use with other types of presentations such as political speeches, religious sermons, educational lectures, movies, etc.