You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

advertising

Using three, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a person believes a certain advertisement provides accurate information.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure a person’s judgement of whether an advertisement emphasized benefits gained by the person taking an action or the losses and costs if the action was not taken. 

The degree to which a person has been persuaded by an advertisement to engage in behaviors that support of a particular cause is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

Using six, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes that consuming a particular product or brand would help attain some of his/her life goals. 

Using five, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s emotional involvement in an advertisement.

The five item, nine-point Likert scale measures a person’s belief that an advertisement uses a story-like format that communicates information about critical structural components such as who, what, where, and why. 

This Likert scale measures a person’s admission that he/she was easily influenced by the message in a particular ad and had difficulty resisting it.  A seven- and a four-item version are discussed.  Although the scale was made for use with ads, it can be easily modified for use with other types of presentations such as political speeches, religious sermons, educational lectures, movies, etc.

This scale uses four items and a seven-point Likert-type response format to measure the degree to which a person believes an advertising message is compelling and convincing.

The degree to which a person believes the information presented or described in an advertisement could actually happen in real life is measured with three items.

With three, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures the novelty and interestingness of a sponsorship being promoted in an advertisement by a sponsoring entity for something such as an event, an organization, or a cause.