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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

advertising

This Likert scale measures a person’s admission that he/she was easily influenced by the message in a particular ad and had difficulty resisting it.  A seven- and a four-item version are discussed.  Although the scale was made for use with ads, it can be easily modified for use with other types of presentations such as political speeches, religious sermons, educational lectures, movies, etc.

This scale uses four items and a seven-point Likert-type response format to measure the degree to which a person believes an advertising message is compelling and convincing.

The degree to which a person believes the information presented or described in an advertisement could actually happen in real life is measured with three items.

With three, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures the novelty and interestingness of a sponsorship being promoted in an advertisement by a sponsoring entity for something such as an event, an organization, or a cause.

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure a consumer’s belief that a particular food product featured in an advertisement is likely to have genetically modified ingredients. (GMO stands for Genetically Modified Organisms.)

How effective a person believes a particular anti-smoking message to be in terms of changing attitudes and behaviors is measured with three items.

The scale is composed of three, five-point semantic differentials that measure the degree to which a person considers a particular slogan to be positive and valuable.

Five, seven-point items measure the degree to which an advertisement caused a person to think of happy events in his/her own life.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how well organized and easy to understand an ad is which a person has seen.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes that a particular advertisement has been aimed at him/her due to some behavior or characteristic inferred by the advertiser.