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Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

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With six, nine-point bi-polar adjectives, the scale measures the degree to which an object appears to be unusual and unexpected.  Given the multiple facets of the construct represented in the items and depending on the way the items are scored, the scale could be considered a measure of similarity, typicality, or novelty.  The scale is general in the sense that it could be used with a variety of objects and in a variety of contexts.  

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used measure the degree to which a person reports that an ad made him/her feel exposed and unsafe.

The degree to which a person believes that an ad is exciting and energetic is measured with four, seven-point semantic differentials.

The scale uses four statements to measure whether a person believes that an ad was deliberately personalized for his/her situation.  To be clear, the scale does not measure if someone liked/disliked the personalization but rather if some degree of personalization was noted in the ad.

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s belief about how favorably “other people” would think a group of people were portrayed in an ad.

A consumer’s interest in a brand that results from exposure to an ad is measured with five, seven-point items.  The interest referred to in the items ranges from learning more about the product to planning to buy it.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s belief that a specific set or type of ads will be personally worthwhile and of interest.

A person’s belief that a particular advertisement is different from others to which he/she knows of is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The statements are general and do not indicate how the ad is different.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a particular advertisement is believed by a person to be appropriate and useful to him/herself.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point items that measure how willing a person would be to purchase a particular advertised brand if it was available in his/her local area at the listed price.