You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

advertising

Snizek and Crocker (1985) used a 10-item, five-point Likert-type scale to measure the attitude toward advertising of professional services, probably from a field that has not traditionally had much advertising. The items in this scale are written so that professionals in the focal field are to respond to them rather than those who might be users of their services. Snizek and Crocker (1985) used the scale with attorneys.

This semantic differential scale measures "felt involvement" toward product information presented in an advertisement. "Felt involvement" was defined by Celsi and Olson (1988) as the motivation to process information in a particular situation and is caused by two other types of involvement: enduring involvement and situational involve ment.

A three-item, nine-point Likert-type scale is used in measuring the degree to which a person indicates that a commercial was annoying and unenjoyable.

The scale is supposed to assess the extent to which a person consults a variety of sources before making purchase decisions. Moschis (1978, 1981) referred to this as information seeking. Given the nature of one of the information sources (one or both of my parents), the scale is intended for children who are probably still living at home.