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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

advertising

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s belief about how favorably “other people” would think a group of people were portrayed in an ad.

A consumer’s interest in a brand that results from exposure to an ad is measured with five, seven-point items.  The interest referred to in the items ranges from learning more about the product to planning to buy it.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s belief that a specific set or type of ads will be personally worthwhile and of interest.

A person’s belief that a particular advertisement is different from others to which he/she knows of is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The statements are general and do not indicate how the ad is different.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a particular advertisement is believed by a person to be appropriate and useful to him/herself.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point items that measure how willing a person would be to purchase a particular advertised brand if it was available in his/her local area at the listed price.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that advertising for so-called “green” products is generally helpful in making purchase decisions.

This scale uses four, seven-point items to measure the degree to which a person believes that an e-mail message he/she has received from a company is annoying and confusing.

Seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a consumer’s skepticism about improvement claims being made about a product by the company.  A two- and three-item version are discussed.

The scale has three, seven-point semantic differentials that measure how much a person believes a particular advertisement is atypical and unexpected.