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advertising

The scale uses four statements to measure whether a person believes that an ad was deliberately personalized for his/her situation.  To be clear, the scale does not measure if someone liked/disliked the personalization but rather if some degree of personalization was noted in the ad.

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s belief about how favorably “other people” would think a group of people were portrayed in an ad.

A consumer’s interest in a brand that results from exposure to an ad is measured with five, seven-point items.  The interest referred to in the items ranges from learning more about the product to planning to buy it.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s belief that a specific set or type of ads will be personally worthwhile and of interest.

A person’s belief that a particular advertisement is different from others to which he/she knows of is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The statements are general and do not indicate how the ad is different.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a particular advertisement is believed by a person to be appropriate and useful to him/herself.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point items that measure how willing a person would be to purchase a particular advertised brand if it was available in his/her local area at the listed price.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that advertising for so-called “green” products is generally helpful in making purchase decisions.

This scale uses four, seven-point items to measure the degree to which a person believes that an e-mail message he/she has received from a company is annoying and confusing.

Seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a consumer’s skepticism about improvement claims being made about a product by the company.  A two- and three-item version are discussed.