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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

advertising

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure one's beliefs about the hedonic value of advertising.  As discussed further below, the items are phrased with respect to advertising in general but they can be easily adapted for use with particular media.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures one's beliefs about the economic benefits that advertising has for a country.  As discussed further below, the items are phrased with respect to advertising in general but they can be easily adapted for use with particular media.

A person's opinion regarding the information value of advertising is measured using four, seven-point Likert-type items.  As discussed further below, the items are phrased with respect to advertising in general but they can be easily adapted for use with particular media.

This scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person believes that advertising makes people buy and consume products too much.  As discussed further below, the items are phrased with respect to advertising in general but they can be easily adapted for use with particular media.

The extent to which a person not only thinks an advertisement is unbelievable, but that it is also misleading, is measured in this scale with three, nine-point semantic-differentials.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's ability to quickly generate mental images as depicted in an advertisement he/she has just been exposed to.

The extent to which a person believes that a particular story and the facts stated in it are correct is measured in this scale using three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale seems to be amenable for use with advertisements, books, and movies by simply replacing the word "story" in each item with something else if desired.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's belief that a story describes something that he/she as well as the person's peer group would experience

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure a person's belief that a story has a climax in which the main character overcomes obstacles.  The scale seems to be amenable for use with advertisements, books, and movies by making minor changes in each item.

Five, seven-point uni-polar items are used in this scale to measure how much a person describes someone or something as being skilled and reliable.