You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

advertising

The extent to which a person not only thinks an advertisement is unbelievable, but that it is also misleading, is measured in this scale with three, nine-point semantic-differentials.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's ability to quickly generate mental images as depicted in an advertisement he/she has just been exposed to.

The extent to which a person believes that a particular story and the facts stated in it are correct is measured in this scale using three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale seems to be amenable for use with advertisements, books, and movies by simply replacing the word "story" in each item with something else if desired.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's belief that a story describes something that he/she as well as the person's peer group would experience

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure a person's belief that a story has a climax in which the main character overcomes obstacles.  The scale seems to be amenable for use with advertisements, books, and movies by making minor changes in each item.

Five, seven-point uni-polar items are used in this scale to measure how much a person describes someone or something as being skilled and reliable.

Using three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person has a positive opinion of product ads placed within video games.  As currently phrased, the statements are not specific to any particular game or facet of the advertising but apply to in-game advertising in general.

The scale uses three, five-point Likert-type items to measure how much a person believes the ads for products placed within video games makes the experience more realistic.  As currently phrased, the statements are not specific to any particular game but rather, refer to in-game advertising in general.

Using three, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures a person's expressed likelihood of donating to a particular cause.

A consumer's attitude about the informativeness and believability of communications from a company is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  While the communication activities referred to in the scale items can refer to advertising, the phrasing is broad enough to include those of a PR nature as well such as press releases.