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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

advice

The scale used three items to measure the degree to which a person believes that a particular set of employees express caring and attention to customers.  This scale does not measure empathy in the sense of one person experiencing the feelings on another but rather employees doing things within their power to show concern for customers.

With four, five-point Likert-type statements, the scale measures a consumer’s belief that other consumers come to him/her for product-related advice and are positively influenced by it. Since two of the items include the word “new” it also suggests that this scale taps into a facet of innovativeness as well as the person’s general ability to influence product-related opinions and behaviors.

A customer's likelihood of expressing criticism of a store and urging others not to shop there is measured with three items.

The degree to which a person rebuffs attempts at being persuaded, with an emphasis on recent efforts, is measured in this scale using four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale measures a person's inclination to use the services of a particular lawyer, e.g., meet with the lawyer, recommend him/her.  It makes most since to use this scale when respondents have some familiarity with the lawyer, possibly having consulted with him/her previously.

The level of importance a consumer places on knowing about and owning new technological products is measured in this six item, seven-point Likert-type scale.

The level of confidence a person has in his/her knowledge of prices for various brands in a particular product category is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the likelihood that a person will say good things about a product to other people and even suggest that they buy it.

The extent to which a person uses a website for informational purposes is measured using three, five-point Likert-type items.  The type of website studied by Hung, Li, and Tse (2011) was an online community but the scale items themselves seem to be amenable for use with a variety of shopping-related sites.

One's assessment of something that has been tasted is measured in this scale using three, nine-point items.