You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

advice

Three, five-point items are used to measure the degree to which a child views him/herself as an opinion leader for friends in some product category and does so by being a source of information and influence.

This scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type statements intended to measure a person's opinion of an endorser's honesty and dependability.

These seven, seven-point Likert-like items were used for measuring the probability that a consumer would base his/her purchase decision on information gathered from personal independent sources (relative or friend) as well as personal advocate sources (store manager or employee).

This scale is a seven-item, seven-point measure of the amount of confidence a consumer has in "personal independent" sources (relative or friend) as well as "personal advocate" sources (store manager or employee).

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a consumer's perceived knowledge of brands in a specified product category as well as the confidence to make purchase decisions and give advice to others about the product class.

Three, five-point, Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person (child, teenager) describes seeking information and advice from his/her parents before making purchase decisions.

The degree to which a customer has expressed dissatisfaction with a company to other people is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person believes that government agencies and officials are benevolent and honest with respect to the way a specified activity is regulated. Grayson, Johnson, and Chen (2008) referred to this measure as system trust-government.

This six item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a person believes that another person who is providing information and advice is benevolent and honest. As used by Grayson, Johnson, and Chen (2008), the other person was a financial adviser.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the extent that a customer expressed dissatisfaction to a third-party about a problem with a business and sought the party's advice about seeking redress.