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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

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The scale is composed of three, five-point Likert-type items intended to measure the degree to which a member of a virtual peer-to-peer problem solving (P3) community believes in the quality of information received from other members of the community and relies upon it. Mathwick, Wiertz, and Ruyter (2008) referred to the scale as norms of social trust.

A consumer's tendency to be a good source of price information for other consumers is measured with seven Likert-type items.  The scale measures a general tendency rather than the likelihood that the behavior only occurs for any particular product category. The scale is sometimes referred to as price mavenism.

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a member of a virtual peer-to-peer problem solving (P3) community believes that the information received from other members of the community is a valuable resource.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items measure a consumer's belief that other consumers come to him or her for information about products to buy and are influenced by the information received. The scale is purposefully constructed to be amenable for adaptation to a variety of product categories but is not a generalized opinion leadership scale. The authors (Flynn, Goldsmith, and Eastman 1996) believed the construct to be monomorphic, such that opinion leadership in technologically advanced cultures tends to focus on one topical area rather than many (polymorphic).

Four, five-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the extent to which a person enjoys being a source of market-related information for others.

This three item, four-point Likert-type scale measures a person's beliefs regarding direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising of prescription drugs. These beliefs could be considered perceptions of the benefits of DTC.

The degree to which a person speaks well of something and does so in an active manner is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type statements. The object of the measurement in the study by Arnett, German, and Hunt (2003) was a university and how well graduates talked about it. The authors referred to the scale as promoting.

Four, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure a consumer's belief that other consumers come to him/her for product-related advice and are positively influenced by it. Since two of the items include the word "new" it also suggests that this scale taps into a facet of innovativeness as well as the person's general ability to influence product-related opinions and behaviors.

Three, nine-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a customer engages in, or plans to engage in, positive behaviors with respect to a particular business that indicate he/she is committed to it. The scale was referred to as behavioral intentions by Brady et al. (2005).

The scale measures the extent to which a person believes that others consider him/her to be a good source of information about product prices.