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Scale Reviews

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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

aesthetics

Three, seven-point Likert items are used to measure how visually attractive and appealing a product’s design is considered to be.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s overall attitude toward a particular color (unspecified in the sentences themselves).

How beautiful and pleasing an object appears to be is measured with four, seven-point uni-polar items.

With three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular website has a visually pleasing design.

The scale has five semantic differentials that measure how attractive and appealing a product appears to be.  Although the scale was made for use with a product, it seems to be amenable for use with a wide variety of objects.

The scale is composed of three, five-point Likert-type items that measure how appealing and striking a product appears to be.  Based on the current phrasing of the items, the emphasis is on the visual aspects of a product’s aesthetics.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular advertisement is visually appealing.

Five items are used to measure how ambiguous and chaotic a visual stimulus with multiple parts appears to be.

The pleasantness and appropriateness of a store’s internal environment is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.  The items refer to the atmosphere in general or to tangibles such as lighting and music but not to layout, design, or people per se.

The extent to which a person believes a particular brand extension is consistent in its aesthetics and production quality with the parent brand is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type statements.  The scale can be used with an extension already on the market or one in development.