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Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

aesthetics

The scale has three, seven-point semantic differentials that are intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that the parts of a particular stimulus fit together well.

The scale assesses a shopper's affectively-laden evaluation of a store's "atmosphere." The version used by Mattila and Wirtz (2001) had seven, seven-point bi-polar adjectives and was called store environment. In contrast, the version used by Baker et al. (2002) had three uni-polar adjectives, a six-point response format, and was referred to as psychic cost perceptions.

A customer's level of satisfaction with several aspects of a brand of car are measured with seven, seven-point items.

The scale has three, nine-point, Likert-type statements that are intended to measure the extent to which one believes an assortment of a given product one was exposed to was aesthetically pleasing.

How visually attractive a person believes a website to be is measured with this three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale.  Mathwick, Malhotra, and Rigdon (2002) also used the scale with reference to a catalog.

Four bi-polar adjectives are used to measure the degree to which a person perceives a stimulus to have a quality characteristic of a broader class of stimuli rather than one particular stimulus. Aggarwal and Law (2005) used the scale as a manipulation check to make sure two scenarios were similar in their levels of abstraction.

The scale has six, seven-point semantic differentials that are intended to measure the degree to which a person views something as being visually attractive.

The Likert-type scale measures the extent to which a consumer expresses a tendency to devote attention to design characteristics of some type of structure such as a store, mall, or office complex.

Seven, seven-point bi-polar adjectives are used to assess a person's evaluation of some environmental stimulus with an emphasis on affective descriptors. As used by Mattila and Wirtz (2001), the stimulus was a store's atmosphere and was called store environment.

A four-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person thinks the material and human aspects of a service provider are visually appealing. As described here, the scale relates to the tangibles dimension of the SERVQUAL instrument (Parasuraman, Berry, and Zeithaml 1991; Parasuraman, Zeithaml, and Berry 1988) but is not equivalent to it. Each dimension of the SERVQUAL measure is composed of the summated differences between expectation items and perceptual items, not just perceptual items as the scale described here is. Carman (1990) used several variations on the scale, as described subsequently. Taylor (1995) only used perceptual items.