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Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

Age

The scale has three, seven-point items that measure a person’s willingness to engage in behaviors that support the lowering of the minimum age to legally consumer alcoholic drinks.

The four items composing this scale are intended to measure a person's desired age as opposed to the number of years lived. Three forms of the scale are provided: ratio, semantic differential, and Likert.

This scale is intended to measure a person's attitude regarding his/her non-chronological age rather than the number of years lived. Various forms of the scale have been used over time but each has included four items that are expected to tap into somewhat different age-related traits: the age one feels, the age one looks, the age indicative of one's interests, and the age indicative of one's activities.

Four items are used to measure what a person considers to be the most undesirable age for him- or herself. While three forms of the scale are presented here (ratio, semantic differential, and Likert), the available evidence would indicate that only the semantic differential version is recommended for use.

The scale is composed of five, eleven-point statements measuring at what age a parent believes a normal child is aware of the advertising-related activities that are used to influence him/her.

The scale is composed of five, eleven-point statements measuring at what age a parent believes that a typical child is able to engage in certain activities that indicate the beginning of the "consumer" role. Although children "consume" products from the day they are born, the skills referred to in this scale are those that develop later when children become more active and independent such as when they begin to purchase products themselves.

A three-item, five-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a consumer believes that a discount is to be used only by those of a specified age group (e.g., senior citizens). The scale was referred to by Tepper (1994) as age segmentation cue manipulation check.

This is a two-item, five-point Likert-type summated ratings scale measuring the degree to which a person (a parent) believes that a child should be ''older'' before being allowed to take on certain responsibilities alone. It was referred to as Fostering Responsibility by Carlson and Grossbart (1988).