You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

analytical

The scale uses ten items to measure a person’s tendency to be engaged in what he/she is doing with undivided attention rather than being distracted such as with multi-tasking and mind-wandering.

With five, six-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person tends to process information such that it is conscious, intentional, analytic, and relatively affect free.

The degree to which a person reports having to force him/herself to continue engaging in an arithmetically-intensive task is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person's enjoyment of puzzles as well as his/her belief that their usage can improve one's analytical ability is measured using three, eleven-point items.

How much a person likes to study math and is confident in his/her mathematical aptitude is measured in this scale with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

With eight, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the tendency of a person to use numerical information, to engage in thinking with such information, and to enjoy it.

The intended construct being measured has to do with a person's general tendency to think either analytically (focus on the parts) or holistically (focus on the whole).  The scale is composed of six, five-point items.

Using ten items, the scale attempts to measure a person's cognitive orientation to either focus on the whole more so than the parts (holistic thinking) or to devote more attention to the parts than to the whole (analytic thinking). 

The scale has been used to measure a type of private introspection and self-attentiveness stimulated by curiosity.  Twelve, five-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

The basis on which a person thinks a decision was made is measured in this five-item, seven-point scale. Essentially, the scale attempts to measure the relative roles played by affect and cognition in a particular decision a person has made.