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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

anger

The degree of conflict a person believes there was between him/herself and his/her partner in a romantic relationship within a specified period of time is measured with five items.

How positively or negatively a person feels about an object is measured with ten, five-point items.  Unlike many, if not most, measures of affect, the items in this scale are full sentences rather than semantic differentials.  The sentences are easily modified for a variety of objects.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person expresses the desire to engage in behaviors that would damage a brand as well as stores and employees that sell the product.

The four statements composing the scale measure the degree to which a customer expresses irritation with employees of a retail establishment for something they have done.  A specific, offending behavior is only referred to in one item and has to do with the belief that the employees were trying to close the facility too early.

Using four, uni-polar items, the scale measures the extent to which a person experienced feelings of resentment and outrage during a particular event.

A person's level of annoyance and possibly anger with another person or action is measured with three, nine-point semantic-differentials.

Four, eight-point items are used to measure how much a person felt free making a particular decision and how negatively he/she feels when freedom of choice is restricted.

A person's strong negative reaction to a decision or action taken by a church is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.  Although two of the items use the term "church," they could be easily modified for use with a variety of organizations, religious or not.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the level of anger a person typically experiences upon learning that a person or group of people have been hurt in some way by others.

The three, seven-point Likert-type items appear to measure more than just how mad a person is about something.  The emphasis of the items is on an extreme form of anger.  It was referred to as outrage by Gelbrich (2011).