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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

anger

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person expresses the desire to engage in behaviors that would damage a brand as well as stores and employees that sell the product.

The four statements composing the scale measure the degree to which a customer expresses irritation with employees of a retail establishment for something they have done.  A specific, offending behavior is only referred to in one item and has to do with the belief that the employees were trying to close the facility too early.

Using four, uni-polar items, the scale measures the extent to which a person experienced feelings of resentment and outrage during a particular event.

A person's level of annoyance and possibly anger with another person or action is measured with three, nine-point semantic-differentials.

Four, eight-point items are used to measure how much a person felt free making a particular decision and how negatively he/she feels when freedom of choice is restricted.

A person's strong negative reaction to a decision or action taken by a church is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.  Although two of the items use the term "church," they could be easily modified for use with a variety of organizations, religious or not.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the level of anger a person typically experiences upon learning that a person or group of people have been hurt in some way by others.

The three, seven-point Likert-type items appear to measure more than just how mad a person is about something.  The emphasis of the items is on an extreme form of anger.  It was referred to as outrage by Gelbrich (2011).

The level of violence a person believes there is in a particular video game is measured using four, five-point items.  Given the phrasing of one of the items, the assumption is that the respondent has actually played the game rather than having merely heard about it in some way.

Eight, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a person reports feeling negative emotions at a particular point in time.  The scale seems to be amenable for use in many contexts but was developed for use with service failures.