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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

appeal

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s belief that the way something was sponsored made him/her feel more positively towards sponsorship in general.

Three, seven-point Likert items are used to measure how visually attractive and appealing a product’s design is considered to be.

With three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular website has a visually pleasing design.

The scale has five semantic differentials that measure how attractive and appealing a product appears to be.  Although the scale was made for use with a product, it seems to be amenable for use with a wide variety of objects.

The scale is composed of three, five-point Likert-type items that measure how appealing and striking a product appears to be.  Based on the current phrasing of the items, the emphasis is on the visual aspects of a product’s aesthetics.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular advertisement is visually appealing.

A consumer’s global evaluation of a service experience is measure with three, nine-point bi-polar adjectives.

The pleasantness and appropriateness of a store’s internal environment is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.  The items refer to the atmosphere in general or to tangibles such as lighting and music but not to layout, design, or people per se.

The degree to which a person likes a store’s interior is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.  The emphasis is on visual attractiveness and layout.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a consumer's beliefs about the degree to which a store has positive attributes such as product variety, fair prices, and good service.