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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

appearance

The seven, seven-point items in this scale are intended to measure a person’s self-consciousness regarding the way he/she looks and the desire to look good to others.  

With seven, seven-point items, the scale measures a person’s self-consciousness regarding the way a reference group of his/hers looks to others, particularly with respect to the area where the group members live.  

The attribution of human-like qualities such as self-awareness and desires to a brand is measured in the scale using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a person believes that other customers in a particular service environment are nice looking.  As measured by the scale, the opinion is based on appearance rather than interaction.

The degree to which a person views an object has having human-like qualities is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The extent to which the parts of a visual object are viewed as being well organized and the text being readable is measured in this scale with three, seven-point semantic-differentials.

This scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person believes that a particular website is well-constructed, especially in a visual sense.

The perceived attractiveness and appeal of an object is measured in this scale using three, seven-point semantic differentials.

The degree to which a person believes that the interior of a certain brand's stores are pleasant and organized well is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale is most suited for a chain of stores that is known for featuring its own branded products, e.g., Gap, Abercrombie & Fitch, Hollister.

The degree to which a person believes that a brand's products are modern and visually appealing is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.