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Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure how much a person likes a website because of the way it  looks.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a shopper believes that the inside of a particular physical space (such as a store) is unpleasant for a variety of reasons.

This scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person believes that the outside of a certain physical space (such as a store) is unattractive.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-like items that are intended to measure the degree to which a person's believes that smoking has a positive effect on the way he/she looks.

The scale is composed of five, seven-point Likert-type statements intended to measure the tendency to compare one's self to people in ads or to friends as a way to determine how to look.

The scale is composed of Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a person expresses an awareness of self as a social object with an effect on others.

The scale is composed of four, five-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure social and psychological aspects of a child's beliefs about caring for his/her teeth in the opinion of one his/her parents. In other words, the scale is meant to be filled out by a parent of the child. Thus, in essence, what is being measured is the parent's beliefs about a child's beliefs.

The scale is composed of Likert-type statements that attempt to measure a consumer's interest in a product category. It also seems to measure a facet of self-concept in that the consumer believes decisions regarding the product category express something about one's self to others.

The scale is composed of six items that are intended to measure the extent to which a person views two objects as having a human-like quality and, in particular, being a pair in some way. Aggarwal and McGill (2007) used the scale with beverage bottles.

The scale is composed of six, seven-point bi-polar adjectives intended to measure the extent to which a person perceives a stimulus to be aesthetically pleasing with the emphasis on its visual aspects.