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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

arousal

A six-item, six-point summated ratings scale is used to measure the arousal-related emotional reaction one has to an environmental stimulus. The scale focuses on the person's feelings rather than being a direct description of the stimulus.

This scale is used to measure the level of stimulation and arousal a person prefers. Over time, it has been used with different numbers of items and response alternatives. Two long versions have been offered by the originator.  A five-item subset was used by Dawson, Bloch, and Ridgway (1990) and referred to as ''stimulation seeking.''

This seven-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a person reports being willing, even eager, to try new and/or unfamiliar stores and products.

Seven statements are used to measure the extent to which a person is chronically aroused leading to impaired functionality.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a consumer experiences strong, positive feelings when buying products. While similar to the many shopping enjoyment scales that have been developed over time, this scale places more emphasis on the pleasure derived from the buying itself rather than the shopping activity.

Four, nine-point bi-polar adjectives are employed in this scale to measure the degree to which an object is viewed as having a personality-like image featuring stimulating and distinctive traits.

Seven statements are used to assess the degree to which a person has an affective disorder characterized by feelings of hopelessness, loneliness, and poor self-esteem.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person says that browsing a website stimulated his/her curiosity. The scale was referred to as the curiosity subfactor of a second-order construct that Wang et al. (2007) called flow. While this factor and the others measured by Wang et al. (2007) might be viewed as a set as composing flow, they do not individually appear to measure flow.  Given this, they are not called flow here.

The scale has four, nine-point semantic differentials that are used to measure how stimulating a stimulus is perceived to be. The stimulus evaluated by participants in the study by Bosmans (2006) was the scent in a room.

The extent to which a person believes an advertisement is arousing and pleasant is measured in this scale with three items.