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This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

arousal

The scale is typically composed of six semantic differentials that are intended to measure one's arousal-related emotional reaction to some stimulus in the person's environment.

The full version of the scale is composed of ten item, five point items and measure the degree of positive affect one has toward some specified stimulus. As noted below, several versions of the scale were created and tested which vary in their temporal instructions. Therefore, the items can be used to measure one's mood state at a particular point in time or, at the other extreme, reference to a year's time may be used as something more like a trait measure of affect. Depending upon the set of items used it may be more accurate to describe a scale as measuring arousal rather than affect per se.

A four item variation of the scale was used by Babin, Boles, and Darden (1995) and was referred to as interest. The three item subset used by Hung (2001) was referred to as arousal. Richins' (1997) version of the scale was composed of three, four-point items and was intended to capture the level of excitement a person felt during a consumption experience. Similarly, Beatty and Ferrell (1998) were interested in the level of positive affect felt during a particular shopping trip and used a four item, seven-point version of the scale.

Various versions of the scale have been used to measure the degree of negative affect one has toward some specified stimulus. Some of the scales differ in their temporal instructions while others vary in the items used. The items can be used to measure one's mood state at a particular point in time or, at the other extreme, reference to a year's time may be used as something more like a trait measure of affect. Richins' (1991) version in particular is somewhat different in that it focuses just on a fear emotion rather than a broader negative affect. Similarly, Beatty and Ferrell (1998) were interested in the level of negative affect felt during a particular shopping trip and used a three item, seven-point version of the scale.

This six-item, nine-point semantic differential scale measures what one is feeling at some point in time.  It was called mood by Ellen and Bone (1998) and used to measure the emotion evoked by an ad that participants were exposed to.

It is a three-item, five-point Likert-type scale measuring the degree to which a person expresses a desire to try new and different things.

The scale is composed of forty items intended to capture a person's need for varied and novel sensations as well as one's willingness to take the risks necessary to achieve those sensations. This is a measure of a personality trait rather than a situation-specific state. As used by Steenkamp and Baumgartner (1992), the measure was composed of forty items using a five-point Likert-type response scale. In contrast, Schoenbachler and Whittler (1996) used the original form of the scale that has forty pairs of items which the respondent is asked to choose between. Shoham, Rose, and Kahle (1998) used the ten items composing the thrill and adventure seeking subscale.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure a consumer's thoughts about the degree to which he/she avoids taking risks in life.

The scale measures the degree to which one reports experiencing a pleasing feeling. It appears like the scale can be used to measure the emotional response to a stimulus (e.g., Mano and Oliver 1993) or a mood that one feels prior to exposure to a stimulus of interest (e.g., Mano 1999).

The scale measures the degree to which one reports a low degree of arousal, specifically feeling calm and relaxed. It appears like the scale can be used to measure the emotional response to a stimulus (LaTour, Pitts, and Snook-Luther 1990; Mano and Oliver 1993) or as a mood that one has felt prior to exposure to a stimulus (e.g., Mano 1999).

The scale measures the degree to which one reports a very low degree of arousal, specifically feeling sluggish and drowsy. It appears like the scale can be used to measure the emotional response to a stimulus (e.g., LaTour, Pitts, and Snook-Luther 1990; Mano and Oliver 1993) or as a mood that one has felt prior to exposure to a stimulus (e.g., Mano 1999).