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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

arousal

Seven, seven-point Likert-type statements evaluate a person's willingness to do whatever it takes to be the center of attention.

The three-item, six-point scale measures the degree to which a person describes him- or herself as being thrilled and exhilarated by some stimulus (e.g., music). Phrasing of the scale was such that it measured the respondent's emotional reaction to a stimulus rather than attitude toward the stimulus itself.

Three, six-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person describes feeling a sense of peace and tranquillity on exposure to some stimulus (e.g., music). Phrasing of the items is such that they seem to be more appropriate for measuring a respondent's emotional reaction to a stimulus rather than attitude toward the stimulus itself.

The scale has three seven-point items in a semantic differential format and is intended to capture the state (as opposed to trait) of anxiety a person is feeling a some point in time.

A seven-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person reports him/herself liking to try new and/or different brands rather than sticking with the same brand all the time. This is basically the opposite of brand loyalty.

This is a five-item, seven-point semantic differential scale measuring how arousing a consumer believes a particular advertisement to be.

This five-item Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person expresses enjoyment with taking risks. The scale was referred to as risk assessment by Bruning, Kovacic, and Oberdick (1985).

A seven-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person reports him/herself to like shopping around and gathering product information even if not immediately needing to buy anything. Raju (1980) referred to the measure as exploration through shopping.

This 12-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person reads ads, shops around, and gathers information apparently out of curiosity.

This seven-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person reports being loyal to what he or she has been using rather than trying something new and/or different. To be clear, it is the tendency be loyal within product categories that is being measured. Raju (1980) referred to the scale as repetitive behavior proneness.