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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

art

The scale uses four, nine-point items to measure which of two objects a person considers to be more valuable and preferable to own. 

How beautiful and pleasing an object appears to be is measured with four, seven-point uni-polar items.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a customer’s belief that a particular deal he/she has negotiated with a business provides equal benefits for both parties.

Six, nine-point semantic differentials measure the degree to which a consumer believes a product is an accurate fulfillment of the creator’s vision.

The scale has five, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person believes a particular advertisement contains elements that are novel or unusual and yet artistically arranged.

The scale measures a person's enjoyment of crafting as well as how much he/she is involved with it.  The scale is composed of thirteen, seven-point Likert-type items.

The four, seven-point items in this scale measure the degree to which a person describes an object such as a product or person as having the quality of elegance, beauty, and status. The scale was called perceptions of luxury index by Hagtvedt and Patrick (2008).

A Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person views an organization of which he or she is a member as having a positive reputation in the community. The organization studied by Bhattacharya, Rao, and Glynn (1995) was an art museum while Arnett, German, and Hunt (2003) studied a university.

A six-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person views him- or herself as psychologically intertwined with the fate of some specified organization. The organization of interest in the study by Bhattacharya, Rao, and Glynn (1995) was an art museum.

A four-item, five-point scale is used to measure the degree to which a consumer's expectations regarding a museum and its services have been met.