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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
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Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

assessment

A person’s chronic motivation to critically evaluate alternatives in order to improve the quality of decisions that are made is measured with twelve, six-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person redefined his/her role in a relationship due to some event.  The event is not stated in the items themselves but should be made clear to respondents in the context of the study or the instructions.

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s interpretation of a complaint made in a social medium as being more amusing than it was expressing a serious concern.

With three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person interprets a complaint made in a social medium as expressing dissatisfaction because of a problem that has occurred.

This scale is composed of four, seven-point items that measure a person's beliefs about the extent to which some focal object has focused his/her attention on positive, valued, and important aspects of self.

This six-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure how much attention and critical thinking is paid to the brand and its features featured in an advertisement.

A person's confidence in his/her ability to assess the quality of websites is measured in this scale with three items.

The three item, seven point scale measures a person's concern about a particular health risk and motivation to be tested for it. The health risk examined by Menon, Block, and Ramanathan (2002) was hepatitis C.

Four, five-point Likert-type statements are used to assess the helpfulness of some product-related information in a brand rating task. It is assumed that the information has been provided to a respondent as part of a study and the concern is how relevant the respondent found the information to be in completing the product evaluation task.

The six item, seven-point semantic differential scale attempts to measure a person's opinion of a measure task he or she has just engaged in. The scale assesses several facets of the task such as how easy it was and how well the measure allowed the respondent to express his or her attitude.