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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

association

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes an object or experience is closely associated with his/her identity.

The scale uses four, seven-point items to measure how much a person has the desire to be around and in touch with things from “home,” however he/she defines it.

The degree to which a person is willing to engage in close, social behaviors with respect to a person (unspecified) who has a mental illness is measured with five, nine-point Likert-type items.

The extent to which a consumer believes there is a strong, positive connection between the price of something and its quality is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale measures the extent to which a person feels the need to be accepted by others and to have them to turn to for help.

How much an object is worth to a person is measured in this scale with three items.  Although the scale might be used for other purposes, it makes the most sense when used with an object that has been owned or associated with someone who could be viewed by the respondent as a "celebrity."  Even if that person is not liked, the association may lead to the object being valued more by the respondent than it otherwise would have been.

Three, five-point statements are used to measure the degree to which a viewer believes there is a relationship between a character on a TV program and a product appearing in the program.

Three, seven-point semantic-differentials are used to measure the degree to which one person (the participant) believes two other people are associated in some way.

Three, seven-point statements are employed in this scale to measure a person's expectation that he/she would interact with a particular person. The other person could be someone real that respondents were familiar with or a hypothetical person described to them as part of the study.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person expresses positive beliefs regarding a particular credit card. In particular, Woo, Fock, and Hui (2006) used the scale to measure beliefs regarding the affinity credit card for a university and, thus, referred to it as affinity card beliefs.