You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

association

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person believes a collective of entities such as people or companies have unity and coherence rather than just an aggregate of individuals.

How much a person views a collective of individual entities such as people or companies as a social group is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes an object or experience is closely associated with his/her identity.

The scale uses four, seven-point items to measure how much a person has the desire to be around and in touch with things from “home,” however he/she defines it.

The degree to which a person is willing to engage in close, social behaviors with respect to a person (unspecified) who has a mental illness is measured with five, nine-point Likert-type items.

The extent to which a consumer believes there is a strong, positive connection between the price of something and its quality is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale measures the extent to which a person feels the need to be accepted by others and to have them to turn to for help.

How much an object is worth to a person is measured in this scale with three items.  Although the scale might be used for other purposes, it makes the most sense when used with an object that has been owned or associated with someone who could be viewed by the respondent as a "celebrity."  Even if that person is not liked, the association may lead to the object being valued more by the respondent than it otherwise would have been.

Three, five-point statements are used to measure the degree to which a viewer believes there is a relationship between a character on a TV program and a product appearing in the program.

Three, seven-point semantic-differentials are used to measure the degree to which one person (the participant) believes two other people are associated in some way.