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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

attendance

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person believes the way an event is sponsored will increase his/her interest in the event and the likelihood of attending it.

With three, seven-point items, the scale is intended to measure how much a person engages in particular religious activities: praying, reading scripture, and attending services.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s willingness to encourage others to attend the games of a particular sports team.

Four, four-point items are used to measure the extent to which a person watches, attends, and enjoys a particular sport.

One's stated probability of going to an event is measured in this scale with five, nine-point items.  Given the phrasing of the statements, the respondent should already have a ticket to attend the event and have some options about what to do with the ticket.

Three, five-point Likert-type statements are intended to measure a person's (e.g., former student's) evaluation of the decision made several years previous regarding a university to attend.

Four, six-point statement are used to measure the importance of several characteristics of a school, college, or university to a person. The object in the Arora (1982) study was a university and he developed Stapel, Likert, and semantic differential versions of the scale.