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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

attention

How much effort a participant put into a study and how interesting he/she considered it to be is measured with four, seven-point items.

This three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a person believes that having to take photos with a particular purpose in mind negatively impacted the personal experience of what was being photographed. The goal of taking the photos is not named in the items but can be provided in the instructions if it is not obvious from the context.

How much a person attentively watched a television program and considered it to be fascinating is measured in the scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Using five, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s emotional involvement in an advertisement.

With four, five-point items, the Likert scale measures how actively a person thought about an object and, in particular, how useful he/she believed it could be.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure one's belief that he/she was being observed in a particular situation.

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures the degree to which a person was daydreaming or thinking about other things during a particular task.

Five, seven-point items measure how much cognitive effort a person put into reading some information.  

A person’s preference for multitasking (switching attention among several ongoing tasks) rather than performing one task at a time until its completion is measured in the scale with 14 Likert-type items.

Four items are used to measure the degree to which a person reports focusing only on product-related information in a task and ignoring other information.