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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

attitudes

This scale uses four, seven-point items to measure how much a person feels that when using his/her smartphone there is a sense of being in a private, safe place.

Usage of one’s phone to help relieve stress and deal with other uncomfortable situations is measured in this scale with four, seven-point Likert-like items.

This seven-point scale measures how much a consumer believes one smartphone is similar to another phone on four characteristics related to ease of use.

The extent to which a person feels that an object is close to one’s self rather than far away is measured using four, seven-point items.

How much a person believes his/her personal actions can help end a behavior that is viewed negatively is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.  The items are amenable for use in a variety of situations where a particular behavior is viewed as inappropriate and the person is not alone in believing it.

With four, seven-point items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes his/her initial experience with a product to have been a one-time event and not representative of the product in general.

The degree to which a person believes the source of some information, probably another person, is pushy and aggressive is measured with three, nine-point bipolar items.

The degree to which a patient believes that the person or device making a recommendation about a medical procedure would not give consideration to his/her unique condition and circumstances is measured with three, seven-point items.

How much a customer believes that multiple brand-owned touchpoints are responsive and adaptive to his/her specific needs, circumstances, and activities is measured using four Likert-type items.

With four Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a consumer considers multiple touchpoints as sharing a common brand theme.