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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

attitudes

How much a consumer has positive beliefs about the multiple products that share the same particular brand name is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, nine-point items that measure how much a company’s ratings are as expected compared to those of other companies. 

Six items are used to measure the belief that a particular salesperson engaged in questioning and answering in an attempt to convince one that he/she (the consumer) would benefit from a suggested product solution.

The scale has six items that measure the degree to which a consumer believes a particular salesperson with whom he/she has interacted tried to build a rapport and an emotional connection between them prior to or along with discussion of sales issues.

Using six items, the scale measures the belief that a particular salesperson with whom a consumer interacted used compliance tactics based on immediate, superficial factors (threats and promises) not directly related to the product itself.

The scale measures the degree to which a person’s motivation with regard to self-improvement is more about accomplishing a goal rather than the activities performed to reach it.  Five, nine-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

How stimulating and exciting something is (or is expected to be) to the senses is measured with three, nine-point items.

The compatibility of a brand and a cause-related organization having some sort of partnership is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

How much a person feels his/her life is important and that he/she is essential to others is measured in this scale with five, nine-point items.

The extent to which an individual or company has put a lot of thought, work, and sacrifice into a particular donation is measured with five items.