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Scale Reviews

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Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

attitudes

The scale uses five, nine-point semantic differentials to measure whether a person considers his/her future needs to be most important or his/her current needs.

The belief that someone put more thought and time into writing a review than the average reviewer is measured with six items.  The object of the review is not stated in the sentences but can be put in the instructions if not obvious from other aspects of the experiment or questionnaire.

The scale has five, nine-point items that measure how much a parental role (mothers or fathers) generally has the primary responsibility for taking care of a child’s needs in the future.  The relative role responsibilities of mothers and fathers is not measured in the scale per se.  A proper comparison can be made if the scale is filled out once for mothers and then for fathers followed by an appropriate statistical test of the two scores.

In general, how much a parental role (mothers or fathers) has the primary responsibility for taking care of a child’s immediate needs is measured with five, nine-point items.  The relative role responsibilities of mothers and fathers is not measured in the scale per se.  A proper comparison can be made if the scale is filled out once for mothers and then for fathers followed by an appropriate statistical test of the two scores.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure the belief that wealthier customers are given preferential treatment by companies and their salespeople.

This Likert-type scale measures how much a consumer believes that two products that have been promoted together are associated because they are used together by consumers.

Beliefs that companies have more power, authority, and design expertise than consumers as it relates to products are measured with six, nine-point items.

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person believes that a particular good or service is new to the market and different from alternative products.

How much a consumer believes a particular product will be used in situations where other people will see it is measured with three items.  A low score on the scale would imply the product will only be used in private, such as at home.

Composed of four, seven-point semantic differentials, this scale measures the extent to which a person believes a certain product has a long history rather than very little past and identity.