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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

attitudes

The extent to which a person feels a sense of personal control in a particular environment is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, ten-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a person who has observed a problem situation believes a particular person is responsible for it.  The respondent is the observer of the problem and is not otherwise involved in the problem that occurred.

This six-item scale measures how much a person believes that the writer of a review was honest and accurately described his/her experience with the “product” (broadly defined).

Three, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person believes that rent-to-own businesses improve lives and provide important services to society.

Three, nine-point items measure the extent to which a consumer likes a particular offer and thinks it is good.  Typically, the measure would be used with respect to an opportunity to buy a product for a certain price.

The appeal of a price-related sales promotion in a particular business (store or company) is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

How much a person is mindful of and attentive to the time until he/she retires is measured with three questions and a seven-point response format.

How long a person felt a period of time was when waiting for something to happen is measured with three, nine-point semantic-differentials.

How much a customer believes that a particular product is not worth the price being charged is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person is concerned that a bad decision about a particular purchase could harm his/her self-concept.