You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

attitudes

How much a person believes it would be a good idea for a product to be upgraded is measured with three items.  The phrasing of the sentences lends itself most to upgrade decisions made by someone else but which the respondent would be affected. 

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how much a person believes that a particular charity needs financial support from its donors.

The extent to which an individual or company has put a lot of thought, work, and sacrifice into a particular donation is measured with five items. 

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure how much a person believes a particular party is at fault for an offense that occurred.

How much something is believed to be characterized by traits such as skillfulness, capability, and efficiency is measured with six, seven-point uni-polar items.  The scale is general in the sense that it has been used with respect to both individuals and organizations.

The degree to which something is viewed as sincere, friendly, and good-natured is measured with six, seven-point uni-polar items.  The scale is general in the sense that it has been used with respect to both individuals and organizations.

The level of risk-related concern a consumer has about purchasing a particular object is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  While the scale was made for use with a product, it appears it could be used with other objects that may not be considered “products” per se such as a house, a company’s stocks, or a rare piece of art.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure how novel and special a person believes the design of something to be.  While the scale was made for use with a product, it appears to be easily adaptable for use with other objects as well, e.g., a house, a pool, a museum.

With four, nine-point Likert-type items, this scale measures a person’s belief that he/she has a clear idea of what a particular brand is about and where it is headed in terms of the types of products it will offer in the future.

Four, nine-point Likert-type items are used to measure the extent to which a consumer would buy a brand again despite having had a bad experience with it.