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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

attitudes

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure how much a person believes a particular party is at fault for an offense that occurred.

How much something is believed to be characterized by traits such as skillfulness, capability, and efficiency is measured with six, seven-point uni-polar items.  The scale is general in the sense that it has been used with respect to both individuals and organizations.

The degree to which something is viewed as sincere, friendly, and good-natured is measured with six, seven-point uni-polar items.  The scale is general in the sense that it has been used with respect to both individuals and organizations.

The level of risk-related concern a consumer has about purchasing a particular object is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  While the scale was made for use with a product, it appears it could be used with other objects that may not be considered “products” per se such as a house, a company’s stocks, or a rare piece of art.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure how novel and special a person believes the design of something to be.  While the scale was made for use with a product, it appears to be easily adaptable for use with other objects as well, e.g., a house, a pool, a museum.

With four, nine-point Likert-type items, this scale measures a person’s belief that he/she has a clear idea of what a particular brand is about and where it is headed in terms of the types of products it will offer in the future.

Four, nine-point Likert-type items are used to measure the extent to which a consumer would buy a brand again despite having had a bad experience with it.

The degree of compatibility a person believes he/she has with a “partner” regarding brand preferences is measured with three, seven-point items.

How well two brands are considered to be compatible and a good fit for co-branding a product or event is measured with three questions and a 101-point response scale.

The extent to which the use of child labor by companies affects one’s choice of which products to buy is measured with three, seven-point items.