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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

attitudes

With three, seven-point semantic-differentials, this scale measures the extent to which a consumer believes a product to be either a luxury brand (at one end) or a “value” brand (at the other end).

The degree to which a person is apprehensive and distrusting of other people in general is measured with four, seven-point unipolar items.

The scale has three, seven-point semantic differentials that measure how large a consumer considers a particular discount on a product’s normal price to be.

Five semantic differentials are used in the scale to assess how cognitively and time demanding a customer considers a particular price format to be.

This three item, 100-point Likert-type scale measures a person’s belief that a particular bank would be a excellent institution in which to put money.  The sentences are phrased hypothetically such that the scale makes most sense when the person is aware of the bank but is not a customer.

The extent to which a person feels he/she has used or consumed an adequate amount of a product in a particular instance is measured with ten, seven-point items.

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person believes that the world is dangerous in general and, more specifically, that he/she does not feel safe.

The extent to which a person believes that a particular program provided him/her with new ideas and other information is measured with three, six-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person believes that a particular individual has the right to make his/her own purchase choices is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has eight, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person believes, in general, that stress can enhance rather than debilitate his/her learning and productivity.