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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

attitudes

With four, seven-point items, the scale measures how much a person believes that he/she will feel unhappy and powerless if there is a failure to experience what was expected with regard to a product choice decision.  The items are phrased such that the focus is on making the choice based on how the options vary on one critical product attribute.   

A person’s belief that he/she is supported emotionally and physically in good times and bad is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  The source of the support is not stated in the items.

Six, eleven-point unit-polar items are used to measure how soft and pleasing an object is judged to be.  The scale appears to most useful when measuring a sensation associated with the sense of touch.  

A person’s belief regarding the durability and stability of a medium’s format is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person believes that an employee has engaged in behaviors to actively and competently solve a customer’s problem.

Three, seven-point semantic-differentials are used to measure how much a person believes that an object is original and uncommon. 

This three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a person believes that having to take photos with a particular purpose in mind negatively impacted the personal experience of what was being photographed. The goal of taking the photos is not named in the items but can be provided in the instructions if it is not obvious from the context.

The rivalry with same-sex others over access to mates is measured with seven, seven-point Likert-type items.

How much a person believes that the story behind the creation of a particular object is witty and likeable is measured with three, seven-point items. 

The scale uses seven items to measure how much a person believes that a particular typeface is uncommon and difficult to read.  Responses to the items are made with a seven-point Likert-type scale.