You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

This website has truly been a welcome gift! The Day Pass is extremely affordable & the site is so user friendly to navigate. It provides a wealth of information including, the source, validity, & references for my doctorate research project. I highly recommend this to anyone as it is truly an invaluable research tool!
Suzanne Cromlish, PhD
Saint Xavier University, Chicago

attitudes

A person’s beliefs about the degree to which he/she is prone to changing attitudes or having them changed is measured with sixteen, seven-point Likert-type items. 

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person believes an object or experience is different from others he/she has had.

The scale uses four, nine-point items to measure which of two objects a person considers to be more valuable and preferable to own. 

The scale has four, five-point items that measure what an adolescent thinks his/her parents would do if they did not want him/her to watch television, movies, or video games that contained too much violence.  Specifically, this belief is a characterized by the parents “restricting” the time the child spends with unacceptable media content by using anger and threatening punishment.

The scale uses four, five-point items to measure the degree to which an adolescent thinks his/her parents are inconsistent in their restriction of the time he/she can spend with television, movies, and video games that contained too much violence.

With three, nine-point items, the scale measures how much time and thought a person believes another person put into writing a product review.

Using three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a customer believes a particular website has low prices on products and shipping.

Three, seven-point items measure a person’s belief regarding the degree to which the family had enough money to pay for food and housing when he/she was growing up.

Four, nine-point items compose the scale which measures the extent to which a person believes an employee of a company has done something that is either immoral and damaging to his/her company or, at the other extreme, was honest and helpful.

This three item Likert scale with a seven-point response format measures the degree to which a person believes that a particular in-store shopping technology would add value to the shopping experience.  As currently phrased, the items are stated hypothetically because participants will not actually have used the technology when responding to the scale but merely have read about it.  The sentences could be easily changed to measure a shopper’s actual experience with the technology.