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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

attitudes

How similar a person believes he/she is compared to another person is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

Three, seven-point items compose the scale and measure how much a customer believes his/her best interests are guiding a particular salesperson’s efforts to solve one’s problem.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a customer believes a salesperson was using high-pressure sales tactics and pushing him/her to make a decision prematurely.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a logo appears to move as if it is alive.

Using four, nine-point semantic differentials, the scale measures a consumer’s belief that a particular food product is not only safe to consume but is nutritious as well.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes that the packaging for a particular product is new and unique.

How much a person likes a product’s quality as well as the way it looks is measured with three, five-point items.  The scale is “general” in the sense that it can be easily customized for use with a wide variety of objects. 

Six, nine-point semantic differentials measure the degree to which a consumer believes a product is an accurate fulfillment of the creator’s vision.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s attitude regarding the bias and believability of a particular news story to which he/she has been exposed.

Using four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person likes natural environments and enjoys spending time in them.