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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

attitudes

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a person believes it is okay to give misleading or incomplete personal information to a company and that he/she is likely to do it.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person has confidence in the reliability with which a company handles the customer data in its possession.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure a customer’s attitude regarding his/her susceptibility to being harmed because of the personal information collected by a company.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how much a consumer believes that a set of brands they were exposed to seem to have been intentionally made to resemble each other.  While the sentences do not explicitly refer to the similarity of brands’ packaging or some other visual attribute, that is the implication.

The favorability of one brand compared to another is measured with three, nine-point questions. 

Three Likert-type items are used to measure the degree which a person believes the reason a brand sponsors something, such as a team, event, or charity, is because it is something that is expected by constituents, e.g., employees, customers, the community at large.

The scale measures how much an organization is believed to be selfish and motivated by its own self-interest.  Two versions of the scale are presented and vary in terms of whether one organization is being described or if two organizations are being compared.  Most of the studies used the same eight items.

The scale has three, seven-point items which measure a person’s disbelief that a particular company is one of the worst ones in its industry as reported by a major consumer organization.  The scale instructions frame the situation as hypothetical but minor changes could make the scale amenable for use with an actual event.

With three, nine-point items, the scale is intended to measure a person’s opinion about how willing a company would be to listen to a customer’s request and agree to it.  The underlying tone of the sentences, which can be made more explicit by the study’s context, is that the request is unusual or against the rules.

Composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person believes that there were too many customers in a store.