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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

attitudes

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a logo appears to move as if it is alive.

Using four, nine-point semantic differentials, the scale measures a consumer’s belief that a particular food product is not only safe to consume but is nutritious as well.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes that the packaging for a particular product is new and unique.

How much a person likes a product’s quality as well as the way it looks is measured with three, five-point items.  The scale is “general” in the sense that it can be easily customized for use with a wide variety of objects. 

Six, nine-point semantic differentials measure the degree to which a consumer believes a product is an accurate fulfillment of the creator’s vision.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s attitude regarding the bias and believability of a particular news story to which he/she has been exposed.

Using four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person likes natural environments and enjoys spending time in them.

Three, nine-point items are used to measure the likelihood that a particular product or brand will be in short supply.  The timeframe is not stated in the items themselves but could be easily stated in the instructions.

With three, seven-point semantic-differentials, this scale measures the extent to which a consumer believes a product to be either a luxury brand (at one end) or a “value” brand (at the other end).

The degree to which a person is apprehensive and distrusting of other people in general is measured with four, seven-point unipolar items.