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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

attitudes

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person attributes thought and emotion to a logo regarding its helplessness and not being in control.

The scale is composed of three, five-point semantic differentials that measure the degree to which a person considers a particular slogan to be positive and valuable.

The scale has three statements that measure the degree to which a person believes that a particular product is the result of cooperation between the customer and the producer.

With three, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures the degree to which a customer believes that, in general, the prices of a company's products are appropriate given the value of the products.

The extent to which a person believes there are benefits to a particular company having and using his/her personal data is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person believes an information-related activity or object is enjoyable as well as worthy of exploration is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale may make most sense in a context where the object being assessed is a lesson, demonstration, or presentation.

How much a person feels that his/her life is meaningful and has some effect on the world is measured with three, seven-point items.

Using four, seven-point uni-polar items, the scale measures how much a person is considered to be skillful and intelligent. 

The degree to which a person believes a particular company engages in social activity and supports causes because of how it (the company) could benefit from the activity is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

This scale is composed of three, seven-point items that measure how much a person believes another person is busy at work rather than spending time in leisure activities.