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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

attitudes

The scale measures how much a shopper believes that a store’s layout and shelving do not provide customers with enough space.  Three, seven-point Likert-type items compose the measure.

A shopper’s belief that the wait time in a store was too long, particularly due to the checkout process, is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The rarity and scarcity of an object, such as a product, is measured in this scale with three, nine-point Likert-type items.

Three, seven-point semantic-differentials are used to measure a food’s healthiness in terms of its effectiveness.  To be clear, the emphasis in this particular measure is not on the nutritiousness of the food but rather how well it helps one to stay physically fit.

The degree to which a person believes there is a relationship between the healthiness of food and its cost such that healthier foods tend to be more expensive than unhealthy foods is measured with three, seven-point items.

How much a person anticipates that if a particular meal is eaten then he/she would feel bad and sorry about it afterwards.  A three- and a four-item version are discussed.  Each item has its own unique semantic differential and a 101-point sliding scale.

The degree to which a person believes a particular food is wholesome and healthy is measured with three questions, each with its own semantic differential and a 101-point sliding response scale.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a consumer believes that what is received when buying a good or service is greater than what is given up. 

How beautiful and pleasing an object appears to be is measured with four, seven-point uni-polar items.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items and measures the degree to which a person believes another person is like him/her in terms of communication style, with an emphasis on nonverbal expression.