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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

attitudes

The degree to which a person believes that a particular individual has the right to make his/her own purchase choices is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has eight, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person believes, in general, that stress can enhance rather than debilitate his/her learning and productivity.

Composed of five, seven-point items, the scale measures how unprotected and unprepared a person feels with respect to the threats coming from the “world” around him/her.

Four semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure how successful and respected a company is believed to be.

How cozy and cushiony a person judges a particular object to be is measured with three, nine-point semantic differentials.  Although “comfortable” can be thought of in emotional or social terms, this scale is most suited for use when rating physical objects, particularly ones that can be sat or laid on, e.g., chairs, sofas, beds.

The anticipated level of improvement (or lack thereof) in one’s performance of a certain activity from the use of a particular product is measured with three, seven-point items.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, this scale measures the degree to which a customer values a particular business and believes it saves him/her money.

The degree to which a customer believes that a company makes him/her feel special and has treated him/her better compared to other customers is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person believes a certain individual shows off in order to impress people is measured in this scale with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

To measure a person’s support for an organization that has an environmentally-related purpose, the scale uses four, five-point Likert-type items.  The emphasis of the items is on the importance the membership has for the person.