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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

attitudes

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular company spends a lot of money on “socially responsible” activities.

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular company spends money on “social responsibility” activities in order to improve its own reputation.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s overall attitude toward a particular color (unspecified in the sentences themselves).

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person has an overall respect of self and feeling of inherent value.

Three semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure how much a product appears to have been touched and is considered dirty. 

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a person believes that a product can be used in a variety of situations.

How much a consumer likes and uses a product is measured with three, seven-point items.  Unlike most other measures of product attitude, this one makes most sense to use with people after they have bought a product and used it.

A person’s beliefs about the degree to which he/she is prone to changing attitudes or having them changed is measured with sixteen, seven-point Likert-type items. 

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person believes an object or experience is different from others he/she has had.

The scale uses four, nine-point items to measure which of two objects a person considers to be more valuable and preferable to own.