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As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

attitudes

The belief that a salesperson was “redirecting” one’s attention by pushing him/her to purchase a product other than the intended one is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has six items that are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes a particular salesperson is competent and has high integrity.

The three item, seven-point Likert scale measures how much a person believes other customers in the store treat employees in an unfriendly manner.

The desirability of an object is measured with four brief statements and a seven-point Likert-scale.  The scale is “general” in the sense that the statements are amenable for use with a wide variety of objects.

The degree to which a person believes that a game has effectively communicated information about a particular featured product is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.   

The extent to which a person says he/she will be excited about a particular sports team beating another team it is playing against and the likelihood he/she will engage in behaviors to express support for the team during the event is measured with four, nine-point items.  The scale items are flexible for sporting events which have two teams playing against each other or when the researcher’s desire is to focus only on two of several teams in a multi-team event such as the Olympics.

The degree to which a consumer believes that a buying a particular product from a particular retailer’s website would be risky is measured with three, nine-point Likert-type items.

With six, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a consumer’s belief that the relationship he/she has with a service firm is based on the fulfillment of specified and quantifiable obligations in the short term.

The extent to which a customer believes that a store carries too many options within a product category of interest is measured in this scale using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale measures how much a shopper believes that a store’s layout and shelving do not provide customers with enough space.  Three, seven-point Likert-type items compose the measure.