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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

attitudes

The five-item, seven-point scale assesses a research subject's interest in and concern about the task he/she performed as part of a study.

The scale has 27 seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which one believes that heath outcomes are controllable. Internals are those who believe outcomes are based upon their own behavior whereas externals think that outcomes depend more on luck, fate, or other people.

A five-item, seven-point semantic differential scale is used to measure the degree to which one evaluates a stimulus (such as a product) as being positive and agreeable.

A five-item, seven-point semantic differential scale is used to measure the degree to which one evaluates a stimulus (such as a product) as being exciting and interesting.

Four, eight-point semantic differentials are used to measure a consumer's assessment of a new product inventor's intelligence and competency.

A seven-item, seven-point semantic differential scale is used to measure the degree to which one evaluates a stimulus (such as a product) as being relevant and meaningful to one's self.

A seven-item, seven-point semantic differential scale is used to measure the degree to which one evaluates something (such as a product) as being vital and necessary.

A three-item, seven-point semantic differential is used to measure a person's attitude about the appropriateness of a certain product/brand being marketed by a certain company. As used by Keller and Aaker (1992), the scenario focused the respondent's attention on a proposed brand extension apparently being considered by the company. The scale seems to be amenable for use in a variety of situations in which the fit between the product and the marketer (manufacturer, retailer, or other channel member) is of interest.

A five-item, seven-point semantic differential is used to measure a consumer's assessment of a particular person's knowledge and competency as a source of information.  The directions used with the scale can focus the respondent's attention on a particular topic or product if desired.

A six-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person who has just gone through an experience with other people describes feeling closer to them because of the events and activities they shared. Arnould and Price (1993) referred to the construct measured as communitas.