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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

attitudes

This scale is composed of six, five-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person is oriented toward possessing goods and money as a means of personal happiness and social progress.

The five-item, seven-point scale assesses a research subject's interest in and concern about the task he/she performed as part of a study.

A seven-item, seven-point semantic differential scale is used to measure the degree to which one evaluates something (such as a product) as being vital and necessary.

A three-item, seven-point semantic differential is used to measure a person's attitude about the appropriateness of a certain product/brand being marketed by a certain company. As used by Keller and Aaker (1992), the scenario focused the respondent's attention on a proposed brand extension apparently being considered by the company. The scale seems to be amenable for use in a variety of situations in which the fit between the product and the marketer (manufacturer, retailer, or other channel member) is of interest.

A five-item, seven-point semantic differential is used to measure a consumer's assessment of a particular person's knowledge and competency as a source of information.  The directions used with the scale can focus the respondent's attention on a particular topic or product if desired.

A five-item, seven-point semantic differential scale is used to measure the degree to which one evaluates a stimulus (such as a product) as being positive and agreeable.

A five-item, seven-point semantic differential scale is used to measure the degree to which one evaluates a stimulus (such as a product) as being exciting and interesting.

Four, eight-point semantic differentials are used to measure a consumer's assessment of a new product inventor's intelligence and competency.

A seven-item, seven-point semantic differential scale is used to measure the degree to which one evaluates a stimulus (such as a product) as being relevant and meaningful to one's self.

A five-item, five-point scale is used to measure the importance a consumer places on objective, functional, and economic issues before buying products. This was referred to as economic motivations for consumption by Moschis (1978, 1981) and Carlson and Grossbart (1988; Grossbart, Carlson, and Walsh 1991).