You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

attitudes

This scale is composed of six, five-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person is oriented toward possessing goods and money as a means of personal happiness and social progress.

The five-item, seven-point scale assesses a research subject's interest in and concern about the task he/she performed as part of a study.

A seven-item, seven-point semantic differential scale is used to measure the degree to which one evaluates a stimulus (such as a product) as being relevant and meaningful to one's self.

A seven-item, seven-point semantic differential scale is used to measure the degree to which one evaluates something (such as a product) as being vital and necessary.

A three-item, seven-point semantic differential is used to measure a person's attitude about the appropriateness of a certain product/brand being marketed by a certain company. As used by Keller and Aaker (1992), the scenario focused the respondent's attention on a proposed brand extension apparently being considered by the company. The scale seems to be amenable for use in a variety of situations in which the fit between the product and the marketer (manufacturer, retailer, or other channel member) is of interest.

A five-item, seven-point semantic differential is used to measure a consumer's assessment of a particular person's knowledge and competency as a source of information.  The directions used with the scale can focus the respondent's attention on a particular topic or product if desired.

A five-item, seven-point semantic differential scale is used to measure the degree to which one evaluates a stimulus (such as a product) as being positive and agreeable.

A five-item, seven-point semantic differential scale is used to measure the degree to which one evaluates a stimulus (such as a product) as being exciting and interesting.

Four, eight-point semantic differentials are used to measure a consumer's assessment of a new product inventor's intelligence and competency.

A seven-point Likert-like scale is used to measure a person's beliefs regarding a particular brand of audio player. Muehling, Laczniak, and Stoltman (1991) referred to this measure as cognitive structure index and used it to examine a fictitious brand of cassette player.