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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

attitudes

Four, seven-point statements are used to measure a consumer's perceptions regarding the overall price level of a store relative to its competitors and disregarding the store's willingness to give refunds as part of its price matching guarantee.

Three items are used to measure a consumer's estimate of a product's price.

This five-item, seven-point scale is intended to measure the degree to which a person describes another person as having skills and/or expertise on a topic. The person being described in the study by Comer (1984) was sales manager while in the study by Dellande, Gilly, and Graham (2004) the person was a weight loss counselor.

Three unipolar items with a seven-point response format are used to measure the degree to which a person describes something as having a quality that indicates a lack of power and authority.

The scale is composed of four statements that measure the extent to which a consumer has thought about how to get a product and use it.

Three, nine-point bi-polar adjectives are used to measure the extent to which a person believes a certain result has been achieved.

A six item, seven point semantic differential scale is used to measure a person's beliefs concerning the time and effort involved in a specified method of placing an order. As described below, the setting used by Dabholkar (1994) was ordering at a fast-food restaurant and two options were compared: touch screen ordering versus verbally placing the order with an employee.

Three, nine-point statements are used to measure the extent to which a consumer believes that the advertised new features of a product provide additional benefits and value to the product.

The scale is composed of seven, five-point Likert-type statements measuring the perceived "costs," mostly non-monetary, of getting a mammogram.

Four, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure a person's belief that buying from a certain company is preferable to buying from others. The scale was called cognitive loyalty by Harris and Goode (2004) and was used with respect to online stores but it appears to be amenable for use with a variety of vendors.